Plant-based diet and cardiovascular diets study

By | March 24, 2021

plant-based diet and cardiovascular diets study

It also has high ratios of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids and of white to red meat. Living Well. Alternatively, it is possible that dietary displacement may explain the inconsistencies. Lack of physical activity raises the risk of heart disease. Grab an orange. For instance, a study in the January American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that eating 3 ounces of unprocessed red meat, three times per week, did not worsen blood pressure and total cholesterol levels. A high salt intake can increase blood pressure. To reduce the intake of saturated fat, the UK government recommends avoiding or cutting down on egg yolks, red meat, butter, whole milk, cheese, cakes and chips NHS Direct,

More people are living with this disease than ever before and numbers are steadily rising. The heart acts as a pump pushing blood round the body, which supplies oxygen and nutrients to all cells and removes waste products. The average adult has about eight pints of blood which the heart continuously circulates by beating around , times a day.

Evidence supporting the role of nutrition in heart failure HF incidence and severity is growing. A comprehensive search of online databases was conducted using relevant keywords to identify human studies including diet and HF. Several other plant-based dietary patterns, including low-fat diets and the rice diet, also show promise. Higher dietary quality, as assessed using different scores, seems to provide protective qualities. Some evidence suggests detrimental effects of dairy products and poultry, but more research is needed. Potential mechanisms for this include decreased oxidative stress, homocysteine and inflammation levels, as well as higher antioxidant defence and nitric oxide bioavailability with gut microbiome modulation. Well-designed randomised, controlled nutrition intervention trials specific to HF are urgently required. Heart failure HF is a major cause of hospitalisation, morbidity and mortality.

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The objective of this article is to present to physicians an update on plant-based diets. Concerns about the rising cost of health care are being voiced nationwide, even as unhealthy lifestyles are contributing to the spread of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. For these reasons, physicians looking for cost-effective interventions to improve health outcomes are becoming more involved in helping their patients adopt healthier lifestyles. Healthy eating may be best achieved with a plant-based diet, which we define as a regimen that encourages whole, plant-based foods and discourages meats, dairy products, and eggs as well as all refined and processed foods. We present a case study as an example of the potential health benefits of such a diet. Research shows that plant-based diets are cost-effective, low-risk interventions that may lower body mass index, blood pressure, HbA 1C, and cholesterol levels. They may also reduce the number of medications needed to treat chronic diseases and lower ischemic heart disease mortality rates. Physicians should consider recommending a plant-based diet to all their patients, especially those with high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or obesity.

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